Wine Guide

Wine Temperature Guide


Wine Guide

Wine Guide


  • Zinfandel: Zinfandel is one of the most popular wines in the United States. This wine exploded in popularity thanks to the state of California. The Zinfandel grape is planted in approximately 10% of all vineyards in California. The Zinfandel grape is a large juicy grape with a big fruity flavor profile. Zinfandel also has one of the highest alcohol contents of any red wine available on the market (14-17%). This grape originated in Croatia and made its way all the way to the United States 1820s when a Long Island horticulturist shipped grapevines over. These wines are known for have a sweet, almost jam like flavor profile and are considered to be very fruity in taste.

 

  • Rose: Rose is one of the most popular modern wines. Over the last two decades Rose has grown in popularity at an exponential rate, not just in the U.S. but globally as well. In France Rose now out sells white wine. Rose gets its unique color from grapes receive skin contact. The juice that is extracted from Rose is clear but with exposure to the skin of the grapes through a process called maceration the juice absorbs color from the skin and turns pink. The grape skins are only soaked for two to three days to gain color. Rose is a very versatile wine that can be had alone or with a meal.

 

  • Riesling: Riesling is a white wine that originates from the Rhine region in Germany. Riesling is a very aromatic grape with high acidity. Riesling is very aromatic with a floral and citrus aroma. Riesling that was grown in cool environments like many German vineyards has a tendency to exhibit apple notes with a high degree of acidity. Later ripening Riesling can have notes of citrus and peach. Riesling accounts for approximately 20% of the vineyards operating in Germany. Riesling is a versatile wine and can be paired with many foods. There are other wines like Chardonnay, which strike a similar balance of sweetness with flashes of acidity to bring balance. This dish can be paired with many different types of meat. Riesling is also strong enough in its flavor profile to be paired up with strong spices that can be found in Chinese and Thai food.

 

  •  Champagne: Champagne is easily one of the most famous alcoholic beverages in the world. Champagne is a sparkling highly carbonated wine that is produced in the Champagne region of France. In order for the wine to be called Champagne it must ne sparkling wine produced inside the Champagne region and undergo secondary fermentation. Champagne has been around since before the medieval times. The Romans were thought to have planted vineyards around the 5th century. Contrary to popular belief Dom Perignon did not actually invent Champagne. Benedictine Monks in the Abbey of Saint-Hilaire have been credit with inventing the oldest sparkling wine on record in 1531. Champagne can range from sweet/tart to dry (usually very dry). The most common type of Champagne is Brut. Champagne is often used for celebrations given its long and illustrious history. Champagne is also paired with light foods and the Mimosa (orange juice and Champagne mixed drink).

     

Wine Guide


 

  • Shiraz/Syrah: Shiraz is an Australian wine with the same chemical composition as Syrah. Yes, that’s correct they are the exact same. Despite the different names these two wines are the same. The original name of this grape was Syrah. The Syrah is one of the darkest wines available, even darker than Cabernet Sauvignon. This wine has a large amount of tannins, which make your mouth feel “dry”. This flavor profile is usually referred to as “full-bodied”. Syrah features many complex flavors such as pepper, berries, and tobacco, which present a rich smoky profile. Due to the deep flavor profile this wine can be paired with almost any food, especially meats. Additionally, Syrah has one of the highest levels of antioxidants compared to other wines, providing added health benefits!

 

  • Cabernet Sauvignon: Cabernet Sauvignon is a red grape known for its hearty composition, thick and durable skin. Originally this wine was developed by an accidental breeding of the red Cabernet Franc and the white Sauvignon Blanc plant. The result became one of the most popular wines available today, known for its durability and high level of tannins. Originally French Bordeaux wine producers developed this wine in oak casks, which resulted in a new flavor profile. Cabernet Sauvignon is known for its high alcohol content (13.5-15%). The flavor profile is rich, and dry due to the high level of tannins. Other flavors include hints of vanilla, green pepper, tobacco, and cherries, which come from aging the wine in oak barrels. This wine is best paired with food otherwise the flavor of the wine can tend to be over powering when consumed alone.

 

  • Pinot Noir: Pinot Noir is one of the most famous wines in the modern Era. Wine festivals and films like Sideways have recently helped popularize pinot Noir in the last few decades. Originally this wine came from the Burgundy region in France. The term Pinot Noir refers to the shape and color of the grapes. The “Pinot” part of the name refers to the grapes shape which are tightly clustered like a pinecone. Noir is derived from French word for black and refers to the dark color of the grapes. Since the best Pinot Noirs are still produced in the Burgundy region of France they tend to have bold flavors. The flavor profile has notes of red berries; mushrooms, sweet black cherries, and an earthy tone will the smell of leaves in the fall. Pinot Noir pairs well with all types of food.

 

  • Chianti: Chianti is a classic staple of Italian cooking. It is also referred to as a “table wine”. Anthony Hopkins cemented Chianti as a pop culture favorite in the 1990’s movie Silence of the Lambs. Commonly Chianti can be found in a straw basket known as a fiasco. Chianti can range in quality and price but usually can be found between $10-$60 per bottle. The flavor profile is that of a dry red wine. The Chianti name like most other wines stems from the region in which it is produced. Chianti originally stems from the Chianti region in Tuscany (central Italy). In order for a wine to be called Chianti it must be first produced in the Chianti region. Secondly, the wine must be made from at least 80% Sangiovese grapes. There are two main versions of Chianti, which are known as “Chianti Classico” and Chianti. The Chianti Classico is generally thought to be more refined and is usually more expensive. Both versions of the wine have a dry earthy flavor profile with a considerable amount of tannins. The wine has a bouquet of strawberries, cherries, and has a high acidity. These general characteristics make this wine great for pairing with carbohydrate rich dishes such as classic Italian food.

Wine Guide


  • Port: Port wine is primarily distinguished into three main categories. There is White port that is a straw gold color. Next there is Tawny port that has a rich amber color. Finally, there is Vintage (sometimes referred to as Ruby). Port wines originate from Europe (like many other wines). More specifically Port wine hails from the Douro region of Portugal. Port is a fortified wine that is not aromatized means that it will have a higher ABV (alcohol by volume). Four begins life like any other wine with a blend of grapes that have been matched and fermented. The grapes are then agitated and stirred to produce as much flavor out of the grape as possible. Unlike many other wines that are made from a single grape, port is made from a blend of grapes. The flavor profile is said to be refreshing, juicy, and deeply complex. In many cases of the vintage was good the port was bottled and left to age with the consumer. This method of aging is thought to help bring all of the different flavor profiles from each blend of wine into a strong and sophisticated cohesion. Ruby ports are sent to age and wood containers for a few years and then are bottled and ready for immediate drinking. This method of producing reports results in a very juicy and fruity flavor profile. The Tawny Port refers to a type of wine, which blends percentages of non-vintage port with ultra – age port that has been aged in small wooden barrels for many years. This method is thought to produce greater exposure to the wood and increase the effects of naturally aging the wine.
  • Madeira: Madeira wine is a fortified wine, which is available in a wide range of styles from dry to sweet. The name of the wine comes from the island of Madeira. The unique taste of Madeira stems from heating the wine, which create very interesting flavor profiles. After heating the wine flavors of caramel, toffee, roasted nuts, and stewed fruit can be tasted. The overall taste of Madeira will vary however it will usually have flavors of caramel, hazelnut, orange peel, and sugar. The deer is usually served chilled with starter courses before many meals. The two main types of Madeira are blended Madeira, and single variety Medeiros. The blended Madeira is generally an inexpensive wine with average quality and very little aging. Single variety of Madeira is the highest quality made from four different varieties. The first of these four single varietal material flavors is Serial, which has the crispest flavor. Next is Verhelho, which is smoky, dry, and rich. Third is Boal, which has a very sweet flavor and shows a lot of aromatic complexity and fig flavors. Finally, there is Malmsey, which is both the richest and sweetest of the Madeira wines. Malmsey can be paired very easily with desserts.
  • Beaujolais: Beaujolais is a French wine, which is made from the Gamay grape. The Gamay grape has a relatively thin skin and is low in tannins. The term Beaujolais refers to the region the wine is produced in. Beaujolais tends to be a very light red wine with high amounts of acidity. The Gamay grape was first cultivated by the Romans and then spread to France. In the 1980s Beaujolais became very popular with Beaujolais noveau wine. Beaujolais wines are made with a technique known as semi-carbonic maceration. The grapes are put in large containers (thousands of gallons) and the weight of gravity crushes the bottom third of the grapes in the container. The grapes then begin natural fermentation with yeasts that are found naturally on the grape skins. Beaujolais is usually fruity and easy to drink.
  • Rose: Rose is one of the most popular modern wines. Over the last two decades Rose has grown in popularity at an exponential rate, not just in the U.S. but globally as well. In France Rose now out sells white wine. Rose gets its unique color from grapes receive skin contact. The juice that is extracted from Rose is clear but with exposure to the skin of the grapes through a process called maceration the juice absorbs color from the skin and turns pink. The grape skins are only soaked for two to three days to gain color. Rose is a very versatile wine that can be had alone or with a meal.
  • Sauternes: Sauternes is a sweet wine from the Graves section of the Bordeaux region in France. The Sauternes wine region where this wine is produced is broken into five communes: Barsac, Bommes, Fargues, Preignac, and Sauternes. Sauternes is made from a mixture of Muscadelle, Sauvignon Blanc, and Semillon grapes that have altered by a condition known as ‘Noble Rot’ where the skin of the grapes become partially like a raisin. The noble rot condition results in Sauternes having a much more concentrated and distinct flavor profile for the wine. Sauternes is known as being a balanced wine. The wine features a nice interplay of acidity to sweetness. Common flavors found in Sauternes are fruits like peaches and apricots. The wine also features notes of honey and nuts. Sauternes most often starts out with a golden to yellow hue and then becomes progressively darker as it ages and eventually turns to a copper color. Sauternes are usually thought to have a minimum 13% alcohol by volume (ABV) level.

Categories

Sign up for the CCR Newsletter!

CCR Archives

Complete Commercial Refrigeration